Approach

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By harmonizing, systemizing and organizing your resources, processes and strategies we create added value in your organization by unlocking growth, transferring knowledge and building your capacity.

 

How is it done?

Our approach typically entails a four-step process:

1.  Meet with you to understand areas of concern.

2.  Perform an assessment of your operations to determine factors contributing to strengths and weaknesses of processes. Depending on the scope of the project, this typically takes two days.

3.  Develop a plan targeting your particular needs, which can include:

  • Training – Training and introducing people in your company to fundamental lean concepts is often an important part of ensuring that people are ready to make changes.

Integrating lean into a company will change the way people view and accomplish their work. Since it is natural to resist change, even when there are better ways of doing things, people need to be brought on board in an effective way. This is the goal of lean training.

A basic introductory course in lean lasts two days and involves a combination of presentations where people are encouraged to ask questions and become involved with hands-on exercises. The emphasis is on helping participants understand why the material is important and how it can benefit both them and the company.

Topics will be tailored to fit the particular needs of your company, but generally include: safety, 5S (keeping things clean and organized), level production, total productive maintenance, just in time, quality, and culture. The modules are based on the Toyota Production System. This system has been the driving force behind Toyota’s phenomenal ascent from a bit player to the global leader in a major industry. Nearly all companies that have implemented lean use this or some variant.

  • Value Stream Mapping – This involves gathering people together to prepare visual, graphical analyses of how processes work.

A value stream is the sequence of activities that deliver a product or service to a customer. Value stream mapping maps out this sequence at a high level to capture not only the flow of physical materials but also the flow of information.

In a value stream mapping exercise a team meets for a day or less to map out and understand the steps and processes that comprise the current state. Next, the team identifies areas of waste and improvement opportunities and creates an ideal of how the value stream should look. This ideal then serves as the goal and blueprint for future kaizen events.

  • Kaizen Events – These team projects often last one week with the goal of getting as much done as possible in a rapid, but effective manner. Areas of focus can include:

Improving processes in office functions such as sales, marketing, inside sales, shipping, tax, accounting, and customer care.

Production and warehousing issues such as cycle time reduction, quality improvement, materials distribution, 5S improvement, ergonomics improvement, workload balancing, preventative maintenance, equipment improvement, inventory reduction, moving line enhancement, and layout improvements.

Kaizen events are typically four day gatherings of a small team of people to address a particular area of concern and are the primary drivers for lean transformations. Area of focus can cover: production and warehousing issues such as cycle time reduction, quality improvement, materials distribution, 5S improvement, ergonomics improvement, workload balancing, preventative maintenance, equipment improvement, inventory reduction, moving line enhancement, layout improvements, and process improvement in “office” areas such as sales, marketing, and finance.

The first day typically consists of understanding the current process and brainstorming improvement ideas. The second and third days involve designing and testing improvements. The fourth day is spent finishing off items, preparing a group presentation, and then presenting the results. If there are pieces that cannot be completed in the one week time frame then effective follow-up is a critical component of any kaizen event.

Beyond producing results, kaizen events are also an excellent way to boost morale, help people to learn about other areas, and teach people about lean tools and leadership. Lean places a high value on developing people, who are the number one asset of a company.

 4.  Follow-up with you to ensure effective results.

Throughout, the emphasis is on doing things simply, inexpensively and gaining team members’ buy-in.

Services (from drop down menu)

  • Business Process Improvement
  • Operational Excellence
  • Employee & customer retention
  • Lean Training & Certification
  • Change Management
  • Instructional Design (Traditional and E-Learning)
  • Strategic Management
  • Governance
  • Communications & Social Media

 

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